Alexandria Community Remembrance Project: Public Programs and Community Meetings

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama includes over 800 steel monuments, one for each county in the United States where a racial terror lynching took place. Their Community Remembrance Project invites jurisdictions to claim and install a copy of their monument. The City of Alexandria is committed to claiming Alexandria’s monument in partnership with EJI.

Page updated on Apr 8, 2021 at 3:22 PM

Alexandria Community Remembrance Project: 
Public Programs and Community Meetings

The Alexandria Community Remembrance Project (ACRP) is a city-wide initiative dedicated to helping Alexandria understand its history of racial terror hate crimes and to work toward creating a welcoming community bound by equity and inclusion.

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Learn about Programs and meetings:


What is The Community Remembrance Project?

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama includes over 800 steel monuments, one for each county in the United States where a racial terror lynching took place. Their Community Remembrance Project invites jurisdictions to claim and install a copy of their monument. The City of Alexandria is committed to claiming Alexandria’s monument in partnership with EJI.

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Community Remembrance Project Lecture Series

Virtual programs, March - June 2021 (free)

Civil Rights March in Washington, DCJoin us for a series of four free lectures with historian Susan Strasser supporting the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project. Susan Strasser is an award-winning historian and a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. She has been praised by the New Yorker for "retrieving what history discards: The taken-for-granted minutiae of everyday life." 

Sponsored by the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project. Please note this events will not be recorded.  A reading list will be provided for each lecture.

All lectures are on Saturdays at 1 p.m. and are FREE, but registration is required, at the individual Zoom links below. 

  • March 20   "A White Historian Confronts Slavery."  Register here.   Reading list.
  • April 24   With Poet Marcia Cole, "A White Historian Confronts Lynching."  Register here.
  • May 15   "A White Historian Explores Black Voting Rights."  Register here,
  • June 12   "A White Historian Confronts Residential Segregation.”  Register here.


Lecture: Joshua Rothman--The Ledger and the Chain: How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America

Virtual program, May 11, 7-8 p.m. (free)

Historian Joshua D Rothman presents his new book, The Ledger and the Chain. Rothman recounts the shocking story of the domestic slave trade by tracing the lives and careers of Isaac Franklin, John Armfield, and Rice Ballard, who built the largest and most powerful slave-trading operation in American history. Register via  Zoom for this free event.  Donations to the  Freedom House Museum, once headquarters of Franklin & Armfield, are welcome. 


Past Public Programs 


Reparations at Virginia Theological Seminary

Virtual lecture, presented on March 24, 2021.

In September 2019, Virginia Theological Seminary announced the creation of a reparations endowment fund and the intent to research, uncover, and recognize African Americans who toiled under the oppression of VTS during slavery and throughout the Jim Crow era. Ebonee Davis, Associate for Multicultural Ministries Programming and Historical Research for Reparations with VTS, shares the research findings and implementation of VTS’ Reparations Program. Davis is a public historian with nearly 15 years experience working for local, state, and national institutions in the Americas and Africa. With VTS, she is coordinating the research efforts of the VTS’ Reparations Program and works directly with the program’s descendant families. This virtual event was sponsored by the Alexandria Historical Society, Alexandria Black History Museum, and the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project.


Edward Ball, Life of a Klansman: A Family History in White Supremacy  

Book Cover: Life of a KlansmanVirtual lecture presented on January 28, 2021

Watch a video of the presentation

For whites, to have a Klansman in the family tree is no rare thing. Demographic estimates suggest that fifty percent of whites in the United States have at least one ancestor who belonged to the Ku Klux Klan at some point in its history. Edward Ball, a descendant of a Klansman, tells the story of his ancestor. Ball’s great-great grandfather, Constant Lecorgne, had a career in white terror of notable and bloody completeness: massacres, night riding, masked marches, street rampages―all part of a tireless effort that he and other Klansmen made to restore white power when it was threatened by the emancipation of four million enslaved African Americans. To offer a non-white view of the Ku-klux, Ball includes the voices of descendants of African Americans who were once victimized by “our Klansman.”  


The American L.O.W.S.

The American LOWS film poster

Zoom Film Screening and Panel Discussion, presented on January 23

The American L.O.W.S. (The American Legacy of White Supremacy), is a documentary created by Darnley R. Hodge, Jr. Immediately following the film screening was a panel discussion with filmmaker Darnley R. Hodge Jr. and historians from the film. The panel was moderated by Reverend Professor Quardricos Driskell. Mr. Driskell is pastor of historic Beulah Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia, an adjunct professor of Religion and Politics at the George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management, and a member of the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project Steering Committee. This film screening was sponsored by the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project, a city-wide initiative dedicated to helping Alexandria understand its history of racial terror hate crimes and to work toward creating a welcoming community bound by equity and inclusion.

Panel Discussion

Watch the discussion here

This panel discussion with the filmmaker, Darnley R. Hodge Jr, and historians from the film occurred immediately following a virtual film screening through the Office of Historic Alexandria. The American LOWS (Legacy Of White Supremacy) is an interview-based documentary that examines the global system of white supremacy and the evolution of that system in America. The panel will be moderated by Reverend Professor Quadricos Driskell. Mr. Driskell is pastor of historic Beulah Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia, an adjunct professor of Religion and Politics at the George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management, and a member of the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project Steering Committee.

The film can be purchased at TheAmericanLOWS.com. At the time of this film screening, The American L.O.W.S. was also available on Amazon.com.  

This film screening and panel discussion was sponsored by the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project, a city-wide initiative dedicated to helping Alexandria understand its history of racial terror hate crimes and to work toward creating a welcoming community bound by equity and inclusion.


A Conversation: Attorney Philip Hirschkop

Virtual program presented on December 9, 2020 
Sponsored by the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project

This conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Philip Hirschkop about the Loving Case and his groundbreaking legal career will inspire you. He is interviewed by Jean Kelleher, Director of the Office on Human Rights. Mr. Hirschkop also answers questions about his Supreme Court cases, his work on prison reform, and he remembers some of his past clients who have included Martin Luther King, Jr., H. Rap Brown, Norman Mailer and the America Nazi Party.

This conversation is sponsored by the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project. It’s the first of a series of conversations we will host periodically with social justice leaders. The Alexandria Community Remembrance Project (ACRP) is a city-wide initiative dedicated to helping Alexandria understand its history of racial terror hate crimes and to work toward creating a welcoming community bound by equity and inclusion.


Community Meetings 

Past Meetings

January 15, 2020, 7:30 p.m., Beth El Hebrew Congregation (3830 Seminary Rd.)


November 16, 2019
, 1 to 3 p.m., Nannie J. Lee Recreation Center (1108 Jefferson St.)


September 21, 2019,
1 to 3 p.m., Charles Houston Recreation Center (901 Wythe St.)

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