Stormwater Infrastructure Projects

Page updated on Oct 11, 2019 at 3:20 PM

Ben Brenman Pond Stormwater Management Retrofit ProjectBen Brenman Pond Location Map

Ben Brenman Pond, also called Cameron Station Pond, is located in Ben Brenman Park.  The Ben Brenman Pond Stormwater Management Retrofit Project will retrofit the existing "level 1" stormwater wet pond to a "level 2" stormwater wet pond.  This wet pond acts as a stormwater BMP to help filter pollutants, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and sediment out of the stormwater that enters the pond.  

PROJECT GOALs AND BENEFITS

  • Upgrade the pond to better treat stormwater runoff to help meet Chesapeake Bay cleanup mandates and protect downstream waterways
  • Landscaping with native plants to discourage geese and provide habitat for riparian birds and animals 
  • New educational signage with ecological and stormwater information around the trail

    Ben Brenman Pond Concept Plan

FUNDING

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) awarded the City a $1.75 million   Stormwater Local Assistance Fund grant for this project. 

SCHEDULE

Construction on this project began in March 2019 and, pending any unforeseen delays, is expected to finish in winter 2019.   

Public Outreach

Connect with the City on social media and sign up for eNews to receive information as this project progresses. There will be a pre-construction meeting before construction begins.  

City staff engaged with residents before and during the design stage of this project.  The following community meetings were held to solicit feedback on the project:

  • Community Meeting #1
    October 8, 2014 at Samuel Tucker Elementary School
  • Community Meeting #2
    July 19, 2016 at Beatley Library
  • Community Meeting #3
    July 21, 2016 at the Parks and Recreation Commission
  • Community Meeting #4
    October 20, 2016 at City Hall
  • Community Meeting #5
    November 28, 2016 at Cameron Station Homeowners Association
  • Community Meeting #6
    June 7, 2017 at Beatley Library
  • Community Meeting #7
    February 21, 2019 at the Parks and Recreation Commission
  • Community Meeting #8
    February 27, 2019 at Samuel Tucker Elementary School


Lucky Run Stream Restoration

Lucky Run 1

Lucky Run is a tributary to Four Mile Run and part of the larger Potomac River watershed. The Lucky Run watershed consists of approximately 225 acres of densely developed urban land and as a result, the stream currently exhibits instability along with several unfavorable characteristics. The project section of the Lucky Run begins where the stream emerges from the culvert under West Braddock Road near I-395 and continues downstream to the wet pond near Ford Avenue and Park Center Drive. Natural channel design techniques will be applied to approximately 950 linear feet of stream to restore Lucky Run to a stable condition and improve stream function, water quality, and habitat.

Lucky Run 2The restored stream will be reconnected to the floodplain which will help filter pollutants, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and sediment.  In addition, banks will be stabilized using native vegetation and other natural sustainable techniques which will mitigate the bank erosion, preventing large amounts of sediment from washing downstream.  Whenever possible, on-site materials will be used in the construction of the project.

PROJECT GOALS AND CO-BENEFITS

  • Restore the stream to a stable condition to improve water quality and help meet the  Chesapeake Bay cleanup mandates
  • Improve the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the stream
  • Enhance aesthetics and further establish the area as an amenity
  • Use native plants to provide habitat for riparian birds and animals 
  • Protect the walking trail and utilities including the sanitary sewer and storm drain outfalls

FUNDING

Lucky Run 3 The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) awarded the City a $668,000  Stormwater Local Assistance Fund (SLAF) grant for partial funding of this project. Currently, the total estimated project cost is $1.9 million.

ANTICIPATED SCHEDULE

This project is currently in the design process.  The design process is expected to be complete in spring 2019. 

Public Outreach

The project is located on private property and City staff have made several presentations to the private homeowner associations.  There will be a public community meeting in the spring to provide general information about the project.

The following community meeting was held:

Public Community Meeting #1
April 11, 2019 at William Ramsay Elementary School (Library), 7 pm - 8 pm

Meeting Presentation


Strawberry Run Stream Restoration

The Strawberry Run Stream Restoration project involves approximately 900 linear feet section of stream located west of Fort Williams Parkway, east of Taft Avenue, and north of Duke Street. The project limits are approximately 500 feet north of Duke Street and continuing north (upstream) to the culvert under Fort Williams Parkway. Ongoing erosion along the stream banks is deteriorating water quality and threatening existing infrastructure. In keeping with the its dedication to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, the City is proposing to use environmentally conscious engineering practices that mimic nature to reconstruct stream banks, encourage native plant growth, and moderate/diminish the impact of streamflow during high-precipitation events. The restored stream will be reconnected to the floodplain which will help filter pollutants, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and sediment. The project's main goals include returning Strawberry Run to a more stable condition and restoring the area as an open space amenity. Whenever possible, on-site materials will be used in the construction of the project.

PROJECT GOALS AND CO-BENEFITS

  • Restore the stream to a stable condition to improve water quality and help meet the  Chesapeake Bay cleanup mandates
  • Improve the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the stream
  • Enhance aesthetics and further establish the area as an amenityStrawberry Run Bank
  • Use native plants to provide habitat for riparian birds and animals 
  • Protect storm drain outfalls

FUNDING

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) awarded the City a $800,000  Stormwater Local Assistance Fund (SLAF) grant for partial funding of this project. Currently, the total estimated project cost is $1.6 million.

ANTICIPATED SCHEDULE

This project is currently in the design process.  The design process is expected to be complete in spring/summer 2020. 

Public Outreach

There will be several public community meetings to provide general information about the project.

The following community meeting is scheduled:Strawberry Run Erosion and Bamboo1

Public Community Meeting #1
November 4, 2019 at Douglas MacArthur Elementary School (Library), 7 pm - 8 pm


Taylor Run Stream Restoration

The Taylor Run Stream Restoration project involves approximately 1900 linear feet section of stream near the Chinquapin Recreation Center and along the walking path in Chinquapin Park and Forest Park. The project limits are from the culvert on the Chinquapin Recreation Center property downstream to behind the First Baptist Church property. The stream corridor is highly disturbed with severe erosion in various locations along the stream with evidence of downcutting and widening at various locations. Significant amounts of fallen trees, riprap, and debris can be found in the channel.  

In keeping with the its dedication to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, the City is proposing to use environmentally conscious engineering practices that mimic nature to reconstruct stream banks, encourage native plant growth, and moderate/diminish the impact of streamflow during high-precipitation events. Restoration will reestablish a more stable condition for the stream and improve water quality. Whenever possible, on-site materials will be used in the construction of the project.

PROJECT GOALS AND CO-BENEFITS

  • Restore the stream to a stable condition to improve water quality and help meet the  Chesapeake Bay cleanup mandates
  • Improve the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the stream Taylor Run Bank Photo
  • Enhance aesthetics and further establish the area as an amenity
  • Use native plants to provide habitat for riparian birds and animals 
  • Protect utilities including the sanitary sewer and storm drain outfalls

FUNDING

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) awarded the City a $2,255,000  Stormwater Local Assistance Fund (SLAF) grant for partial funding of this project. Currently, the total estimated project cost is $4.5 million.

ANTICIPATED SCHEDULE

This project is currently in the design process.  The design process is expected to be complete in summer 2020. 

Public Outreach

There will be several public community meetings to provide general information about the project. Please check back for future meeting dates and times.


Completed Projects


Lake Cook Stormwater Management Retrofit ProjectLake Cook Location Map

Lake Cook is located along Eisenhower Avenue in Cameron Run Regional Park, adjacent to Great Waves Waterpark.  The Lake Cook Stormwater Management Retrofit Project will retrofit the existing fishing pond to a stormwater wet pond.  This wet pond will act as a stormwater best management practice (BMP) to help filter pollutants, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and sediment out of the stormwater that enters the pond.  

The City of Alexandria Public Art Program has selected artist David Hess to join the Lake Cook design team to integrate public art into the retrofit project. 

Lake Cook is stocked for fishing by the Department of Games and Inland Fisheries.  Please visit the Department of Games and Inland Fisheries website www.dgif.virginia.gov for information about the stocking schedule.  

Project Goals and Benefits

  • Upgrade the lake to to better treat stormwater runoff to help meet Chesapeake Bay cleanup mandates and protect downstream waterways
  • Enhance amenities, create new trail connections and new fishing opportunities
  • Landscaping with native plants to discourage geese and provide habitat for riparian birds and animals 
  • New educational signage with ecological and stormwater information around the trail

Lake Cook  Lake Cook Illustrative Site Plan

Funding

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) awarded the City a $1.5 million Stormwater Local Assistance Fund grant for this project. 

Schedule

Construction on this project was completed in fall 2018.  


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